Small Space Food Gardens

Why you need a soil test

Get To Know Your Soil! Soil tests help identify the fertility of your garden or lawn, eliminating guesswork when it comes to choosing the best plant for a project. A test can determine pH levels, nutrient imbalances or deficiencies, and any potential contamination issues. In Connecticut gardeners can send samples to their local UConn Extension…

Community Gardener’s Checklist

If it is an accessible option, we strongly encourage urban gardeners to invest in a community garden plot. Community gardens help urban areas improve food security by increasing access to fresh foods, and maintaining a garden plot is an easy form of passive exercise that benefits both body and mind. In addition to the nutritional…

Simple Square Foot Gardening

Square foot gardening is an easy and versatile approach to urban food gardening that can be adapted to everyone’s needs. Whether you are a busy professional who just wants to grow some fresh salad on a balcony, or a big family growing your own backyard vegetables, this method is perfect for any type of urban…

City Grown: Container Gardening with Vegetables

Creating your own urban minigarden is easy, and delicious! With three simple items (containers, soil, and seeds) you can enjoy a variety of herbs and vegetables even if you don’t have a yard. Start your own vegetable container garden with these easy steps! An old bookshelf and empty nursery pots (from houseplant purchases) are perfect…

Succession Planting for Vegetable Gardens

Succession planting is a method in which gardeners complete several plantings to increase crop availability during the growing season and maximize yield. Successful succession planting involves pulling out spent crops and immediately transplanting seedlings, or planting seeds into the empty space. As the growing season progresses, warm season crops replace early cold season crops. Once…

Companion Planting for Vegetables

Companion planting is used by gardeners to maximize space and increase crop productivity of vegetable crops. Including flowers and herbs as vegetable companions also helps gardeners create habitats for beneficial insects, increase pest control, and aide in attracting vital pollinators. Some vegetables are also beneficial to flowering plants! Onions are known to help to protect…

Edible Flowers for Vegetable Gardens

Edible flowers are the perfect companions for your vegetable garden! Blooms attract vital pollinators like bees, butterflies, and birds while adding beauty. Leaves and young shoots make healthy and delicious additions to salads, teas, and other dishes to compliment vegetable crops. Borage (Borago officinalis) an easy to grow annual, Borage produces blue flowers that are…


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